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  • Originalmente publicado por DOGVILLE86 Ver Mensaje
    Como decía Peter Lynch.... alquien que conoce a fondo un negocio debería empezar a invertir en ese negocio. Nadie mejor que alguien que vive el día a día de un sector puede entender cómo funciona ese sectror, los problemas intrínsecos que tiene, etc.

    Probablemente tú Fonsiman lo tienes más fácil que la mayoría de financieros, porque entiendes de lo que hablas. Por cierto, y perdona si abuso de tu confianza pero ¿qué opinas de New Gold como minera de Oro para medio plazo? Ah, y otra pregunta (perdonad el off topic)... ¿en qué momento del ciclo estamos para adquirir oro como moneda refugio?

    Gracias por tus post. He aprendido muchísimo de sopetón. Una salvajada.
    La demanda de litio sigue creciendo y se espera que siga durante años. Numerosas casas de coches como Volvo , Volkswagen, etc ya tienen pensado ir aumentando los modelos de coches eléctricos.


    Electric Vehicles
    Add to myFT Electric car growth sparks environmental concerns
    Mining of raw materials and recycling of lithium-ion batteries in spotlightRead next
    Faraday scraps $1bn Las Vegas electric car factory
    Tuesday, 11 July, 2017 Lithium is extracted from brines beneath the desert and evaporated using the energy of the sun © EPA
    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Share on Whatsapp (opens new window) Print this page
    Save July 7, 2017 by: Henry Sanderson

    Tesla Motors and now Volvo may have big plans to end the addiction of drivers to fossil fuels via electric vehicles, however the environmental footprint of mining raw materials used in car batteries and their eventual disposal are emerging as a flash point.

    As the mining sector presents a green face and extracts raw materials from lithium to cobalt and nickel that constitute electric batteries, so the focus on their environmental standards and energy efficient production methods will intensify. At the tail-end of the electric vehicle boom is the matter of improving the recycling of lithium-ion batteries and making sure the environmental impact is also contained.

    “There will be more scrutiny over the supply chain for electric vehicles than there is from the consumer electronics industry due to the green credentials of EVs,” says Robert Baylis, an analyst at consultancy Roskill. “And recycling is probably not going to have an impact for 10 years, and may not reach significant volume for 15-30 years.”

    This week Volvo Cars said by 2019 all its new cars will be electric, while Tesla is set to launch its first mass-market Model 3 electric car this month. A 12-fold increase in battery capacity will be required by 2025, according to analysts at UBS.

    Mining companies are already positioning themselves to meet the increased need for raw materials that go into lithium-ion batteries, but there is growing concerns over their environmental footprint especially as a host of new mining companies start production to meet rapid rises in demand.



    Lithium is currently extracted from brines beneath the deserts of South America and evaporated using the energy of the sun. But an increasing proportion is coming from crushing rock in Australia and processing the mineral in China, which is more energy intensive. Goldman Sachs expects capacity addition by hard rock to be equal to brine by 2020 in order to meet demand from electric vehicles.

    In addition, most of the new supply is coming from smaller mining companies rather than established players, according to Francis Condon, an energy and mining analyst at fund manager RobecoSAM.

    “We’re starting to see new sources being found and smaller mining companies and also non-mining companies getting involved,” says Mr Condon. “Some of these opportunities are arising where environmental codes are not as strong and social settings not as protective or inclusive. It’s a combination of risks.”

    Most of the raw materials in an electric vehicle battery are used in the cathode, the electrode that provides electricity when the battery is discharging.

    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart About 50 per cent of the energy footprint of the battery cathode is consumed by nickel and cobalt production. Lithium accounts for about 5-20 per cent, depending on whether it comes from brines or hard rock sources, according to David Deak, chief technical officer of miner Lithium Americas, and who formerly worked for Tesla.

    “In the short term the CO2 footprint from [lithium] hardrocks will be less than ideal,” says Mr Deak. “But it is still extremely beneficial in offsetting the CO2 emissions that otherwise would come from internal combustion engines.”

    He adds: “In the future, you can expect renewables to dominate as the energy source, thus reducing the CO2 footprint regardless of energy intensity of manufacturing.’’

    Chile’s SQM, one of the largest producers of lithium from brine, said more than 97 per cent of its energy comes from the sun, and other types of energy is only used for pumping and transporting the brine to its plants. It estimates it produces 1 tonne of C02 per tonne of lithium carbonate produced.

    Lex in-depth
    Together in electric dreams
    A collaborative future with traditional carmakers beckons

    Tuesday, 11 July, 2017
    Large mining companies are increasingly using renewable energy sources and trying to reduce their environmental impact as they supply materials for electric vehicle batteries.

    Last month Russia’s Norilsk Nickel, the world’s second-largest nickel producer, signed an agreement with European chemicals company BASF for the supply of materials for the production of lithium-ion batteries in Europe.

    Norilsk has started to release data on its greenhouse gas emissions. Last year it emitted over 10m tonnes of C02 equivalent but reduced the use of coal in its energy mix by 49 per cent, according to figures from the company.

    “The mining industry needs to continue to improve, you can’t rest on laurels,” says Markus Meurer, head of global sales and marketing at Norilsk. “EVs gives us an additional opportunity to improve.”

    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart Still, there are unintended consequences from sudden demand for nickel in batteries, he says. Diversion of the metal from its traditional stainless steel market will mean increasing supply from polluting production in Indonesia and the Philippines.

    To offset the environmental impact of mining there will have to be a large build out in recycling facilities to meet the first wave of electric vehicles, analysts say. Currently more than 90 per cent of lead-acid batteries used in conventional gasoline cars are recycled, versus less than 5 per cent of lithium-ion batteries. An estimated 11m tonnes of spent lithium-ion battery packs will be discarded between now and 2030, according to Canada-based Li-Cycle, a recycler of batteries.

    “One of the challenges of making battery recycling economically viable is the quantity of battery material that is needed to keep utilisation rates of recycling facilities sufficiently high,” say analysts at Morgan Stanley. “The risk, therefore, is there may not be the necessary infrastructure in place in time for the first significant wave of EV batteries to reach end of life.”

    Companies such as Belgium-based Umicore have already started to recycle lithium-ion batteries and are investing in expanding their capacity. Marc Grynberg, chief executive of Umicore, says massive volumes of spent batteries will start coming on to the market for recycling around 2025.

    “Battery recycling will be crucial in order to deal with some of the concerns and issues in terms of availability of raw materials,” he adds.

    Comentario


    • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
      La demanda de litio sigue creciendo y se espera que siga durante años. Numerosas casas de coches como Volvo , Volkswagen, etc ya tienen pensado ir aumentando los modelos de coches eléctricos.


      Electric Vehicles
      Add to myFT Electric car growth sparks environmental concerns
      Mining of raw materials and recycling of lithium-ion batteries in spotlightRead next
      Faraday scraps $1bn Las Vegas electric car factory
      Tuesday, 11 July, 2017 Lithium is extracted from brines beneath the desert and evaporated using the energy of the sun © EPA
      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Share on Whatsapp (opens new window) Print this page
      Save July 7, 2017 by: Henry Sanderson

      Tesla Motors and now Volvo may have big plans to end the addiction of drivers to fossil fuels via electric vehicles, however the environmental footprint of mining raw materials used in car batteries and their eventual disposal are emerging as a flash point.

      As the mining sector presents a green face and extracts raw materials from lithium to cobalt and nickel that constitute electric batteries, so the focus on their environmental standards and energy efficient production methods will intensify. At the tail-end of the electric vehicle boom is the matter of improving the recycling of lithium-ion batteries and making sure the environmental impact is also contained.

      “There will be more scrutiny over the supply chain for electric vehicles than there is from the consumer electronics industry due to the green credentials of EVs,” says Robert Baylis, an analyst at consultancy Roskill. “And recycling is probably not going to have an impact for 10 years, and may not reach significant volume for 15-30 years.”

      This week Volvo Cars said by 2019 all its new cars will be electric, while Tesla is set to launch its first mass-market Model 3 electric car this month. A 12-fold increase in battery capacity will be required by 2025, according to analysts at UBS.

      Mining companies are already positioning themselves to meet the increased need for raw materials that go into lithium-ion batteries, but there is growing concerns over their environmental footprint especially as a host of new mining companies start production to meet rapid rises in demand.



      Lithium is currently extracted from brines beneath the deserts of South America and evaporated using the energy of the sun. But an increasing proportion is coming from crushing rock in Australia and processing the mineral in China, which is more energy intensive. Goldman Sachs expects capacity addition by hard rock to be equal to brine by 2020 in order to meet demand from electric vehicles.

      In addition, most of the new supply is coming from smaller mining companies rather than established players, according to Francis Condon, an energy and mining analyst at fund manager RobecoSAM.

      “We’re starting to see new sources being found and smaller mining companies and also non-mining companies getting involved,” says Mr Condon. “Some of these opportunities are arising where environmental codes are not as strong and social settings not as protective or inclusive. It’s a combination of risks.”

      Most of the raw materials in an electric vehicle battery are used in the cathode, the electrode that provides electricity when the battery is discharging.

      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart About 50 per cent of the energy footprint of the battery cathode is consumed by nickel and cobalt production. Lithium accounts for about 5-20 per cent, depending on whether it comes from brines or hard rock sources, according to David Deak, chief technical officer of miner Lithium Americas, and who formerly worked for Tesla.

      “In the short term the CO2 footprint from [lithium] hardrocks will be less than ideal,” says Mr Deak. “But it is still extremely beneficial in offsetting the CO2 emissions that otherwise would come from internal combustion engines.”

      He adds: “In the future, you can expect renewables to dominate as the energy source, thus reducing the CO2 footprint regardless of energy intensity of manufacturing.’’

      Chile’s SQM, one of the largest producers of lithium from brine, said more than 97 per cent of its energy comes from the sun, and other types of energy is only used for pumping and transporting the brine to its plants. It estimates it produces 1 tonne of C02 per tonne of lithium carbonate produced.

      Lex in-depth
      Together in electric dreams
      A collaborative future with traditional carmakers beckons

      Tuesday, 11 July, 2017
      Large mining companies are increasingly using renewable energy sources and trying to reduce their environmental impact as they supply materials for electric vehicle batteries.

      Last month Russia’s Norilsk Nickel, the world’s second-largest nickel producer, signed an agreement with European chemicals company BASF for the supply of materials for the production of lithium-ion batteries in Europe.

      Norilsk has started to release data on its greenhouse gas emissions. Last year it emitted over 10m tonnes of C02 equivalent but reduced the use of coal in its energy mix by 49 per cent, according to figures from the company.

      “The mining industry needs to continue to improve, you can’t rest on laurels,” says Markus Meurer, head of global sales and marketing at Norilsk. “EVs gives us an additional opportunity to improve.”

      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart Still, there are unintended consequences from sudden demand for nickel in batteries, he says. Diversion of the metal from its traditional stainless steel market will mean increasing supply from polluting production in Indonesia and the Philippines.

      To offset the environmental impact of mining there will have to be a large build out in recycling facilities to meet the first wave of electric vehicles, analysts say. Currently more than 90 per cent of lead-acid batteries used in conventional gasoline cars are recycled, versus less than 5 per cent of lithium-ion batteries. An estimated 11m tonnes of spent lithium-ion battery packs will be discarded between now and 2030, according to Canada-based Li-Cycle, a recycler of batteries.

      “One of the challenges of making battery recycling economically viable is the quantity of battery material that is needed to keep utilisation rates of recycling facilities sufficiently high,” say analysts at Morgan Stanley. “The risk, therefore, is there may not be the necessary infrastructure in place in time for the first significant wave of EV batteries to reach end of life.”

      Companies such as Belgium-based Umicore have already started to recycle lithium-ion batteries and are investing in expanding their capacity. Marc Grynberg, chief executive of Umicore, says massive volumes of spent batteries will start coming on to the market for recycling around 2025.

      “Battery recycling will be crucial in order to deal with some of the concerns and issues in terms of availability of raw materials,” he adds.
      Volvo apuesta por el coche eléctrico

      http://www.expansion.com/empresas/mo...17e8b4611.html

      Comentario


      • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
        Volvo apuesta por el coche eléctrico

        http://www.expansion.com/empresas/mo...17e8b4611.html
        Why I think Galaxy Resources Limited could be a great buy and hold investment




        http://www.fool.com.au/2017/07/27/wh...ld-investment/

        Comentario


        • Originalmente publicado por calbot Ver Mensaje
          Fonsiman, de nuevo gracias por la respuesta. No te malinterpreté, sé que tu intención es buena en el sentido de que esto es otro tipo de estrategia distinta a la habitual del foro.

          Simplemente quise matizar porque el riesgo que le asignas no es tal, ni su estrategia consiste en vender activos baratos.
          No es crítica ni mucho menos porque no tienes por qué conocer los datos. Yo la sigo desde hace 1 año (ésta y unas cuantas más en las que también estoy invertido) y le dedico mucho tiempo. Es un mercado opaco (no cotiza como el oro o el cobre), en el que es importante conocer bien las fuentes y aislarse del ruido.

          El precio del litio ha subido muchísimo por la fuerte demanda para baterías. Hay mucho retraso en el lado de la oferta para satisfacer la demanda, lo que asegura años con márgenes muy altos a los productores actuales o los que entren en el mercado pronto. Sus otros dos proyectos (Sal de Vida -estudio de viabilidad de 2016 con vida de 40 años- y James Bay -en exploración para actualizar reservas-) ten por seguro que se van a explotar. Los chinos están invirtiendo mucho. Mientras tanto Mt. Catlin es muy rentable ($860/t precio de venta actual, contratos para el año que viene son al alza y costes bajando poco a poco) lo que le da un buen cashflow por el que además no paga impuesto de sociedades porque tiene A$214m de créditos fiscales.

          Estaría bien que te pasaras por aquí de vez en cuando, ya que tengo intención de mantenerlas varios años. A no ser que nos la compren antes.

          Saludos.
          Gracias a vosotros por leerme. Disculpad, ando bastante liado últimamente.

          A ver, mi mensaje es que estas empresas poseen bastante más riesgos de lo que puede parecer. Como os comenté nosotros investigamos una a fondo, muy a fondo y prácticamente todo lo que publicaban era mentira. Son empresas que se financian mucho en Bolsa, por lo que les interesa tener una buena cotización. No obstante, todas las junior no serán igual, por supuesto.

          En cuando New Gold, pues la verdad que parece más interesante. Tiene 4 operaciones (en realidad 3, Cerro San Pedro debe estar ya clausurada), que aunque son humildes, pequeñas, la empresa no es muy grande y les está permitiendo rentabilizar. Luego tiene dos proyectos más interesante, especialmente Blackwater. Me sorprende las inversiones que dicen haber hecho sobre Rainy River (más de 900 millones). Habrá que ver bien dónde y quién ha hecho la inversión (el proyecto es de la cartera de Bayfield Ventures, que adquirieron en 2015). No sé, para evaluar una empresa así hay que leerse bien sus cuentas anuales, que por cierto no publican auditadas, sus NI-43101, que por cierto no he visto firmados (he visto algún logo de SRK, lo que da cierta confianza).

          Para decirte algo más en firme tendría que leerme y estudiar cada uno de sus informes, pero a primera vista parece una empresa minera pequeña que está funcionando extrayendo mineral de pequeños depósitos y con proyecto en cartera que si salen adelante podrían ser un buen pelotazo. Pero como digo, con mi experiencia en las junior, no pondría la mano en el fuego por ninguna de ellas, aunque junior buenas debe de haber.

          En cuanto a la cotización del oro... Yo soy ingeniero, no analista. Solo comentarte que las expectativas de la industria es una mejora del precio de los metales, aunque bastante moderada. Metales como el Zn, el Mo, el Pb o la Ag han mejorado muchísimo su precio respecto al 2016 (aunque algunos, como la Ag, perdieron mucho valor el año pasado). La subida del Au fue más moderada, y en mi opinión seguirá siendo así. OJO! Lo vuelvo a decir, soy ingeniero, no analista (y te aseguro que también los analistas se equivocan más que una escopeta de balines).

          Tómate estas palabras con mucha cautela, ni tengo una carrera muy dilatada, ni soy experto en nada, aunque me dedique a ello, es simplemente lo que mi experiencia me ha hecho ver y lo que mi visión me dice del sector.

          Un saludo!
          Mi web sobre criptomonedas: lacentralbitcoin.com

          Comentario


          • Originalmente publicado por Fonsiman Ver Mensaje
            Gracias a vosotros por leerme. Disculpad, ando bastante liado últimamente.

            A ver, mi mensaje es que estas empresas poseen bastante más riesgos de lo que puede parecer. Como os comenté nosotros investigamos una a fondo, muy a fondo y prácticamente todo lo que publicaban era mentira. Son empresas que se financian mucho en Bolsa, por lo que les interesa tener una buena cotización. No obstante, todas las junior no serán igual, por supuesto.

            En cuando New Gold, pues la verdad que parece más interesante. Tiene 4 operaciones (en realidad 3, Cerro San Pedro debe estar ya clausurada), que aunque son humildes, pequeñas, la empresa no es muy grande y les está permitiendo rentabilizar. Luego tiene dos proyectos más interesante, especialmente Blackwater. Me sorprende las inversiones que dicen haber hecho sobre Rainy River (más de 900 millones). Habrá que ver bien dónde y quién ha hecho la inversión (el proyecto es de la cartera de Bayfield Ventures, que adquirieron en 2015). No sé, para evaluar una empresa así hay que leerse bien sus cuentas anuales, que por cierto no publican auditadas, sus NI-43101, que por cierto no he visto firmados (he visto algún logo de SRK, lo que da cierta confianza).

            Para decirte algo más en firme tendría que leerme y estudiar cada uno de sus informes, pero a primera vista parece una empresa minera pequeña que está funcionando extrayendo mineral de pequeños depósitos y con proyecto en cartera que si salen adelante podrían ser un buen pelotazo. Pero como digo, con mi experiencia en las junior, no pondría la mano en el fuego por ninguna de ellas, aunque junior buenas debe de haber.

            En cuanto a la cotización del oro... Yo soy ingeniero, no analista. Solo comentarte que las expectativas de la industria es una mejora del precio de los metales, aunque bastante moderada. Metales como el Zn, el Mo, el Pb o la Ag han mejorado muchísimo su precio respecto al 2016 (aunque algunos, como la Ag, perdieron mucho valor el año pasado). La subida del Au fue más moderada, y en mi opinión seguirá siendo así. OJO! Lo vuelvo a decir, soy ingeniero, no analista (y te aseguro que también los analistas se equivocan más que una escopeta de balines).

            Tómate estas palabras con mucha cautela, ni tengo una carrera muy dilatada, ni soy experto en nada, aunque me dedique a ello, es simplemente lo que mi experiencia me ha hecho ver y lo que mi visión me dice del sector.

            Un saludo!


            Minera de oro hay una muy buena australiana, Northern Star Resources, tiene gran fortaleza financiera y no está cara. Per 14.

            Ultima noticia de hoy de Galaxy Resources, resultados buenos de perforaciones en Quebec

            http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/2017080...dcpjlv3qwx.pdf

            Comentario


            • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
              Minera de oro hay una muy buena australiana, Northern Star Resources, tiene gran fortaleza financiera y no está cara. Per 14.

              Ultima noticia de hoy de Galaxy Resources, resultados buenos de perforaciones en Quebec

              http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/2017080...dcpjlv3qwx.pdf
              Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY) James Bay Drilling Delivers Further High Grade Results

              WWW:www.galaxylithium.com

              Company Overview

              Perth, Aug 2, 2017 AEST (ABN Newswire) - Galaxy Resources Limited ("Galaxy" or the "Company") (ASX:GXY) (OTCMKTS:GALXF) is pleased to announce further assays from its 2017 drilling campaign at the James Bay Project in Quebec, Canada.

              In late March, the Galaxy James Bay team commenced a ~31,000m diamond drilling campaign to extend and develop the existing resource at the James Bay Project in Quebec, Canada. 29,300m of drilling to date has been completed with the entire program now expected to be completed by the end of August 2017.

              Highlights from the most recent stage of drilling (all intercept data reported downhole) and assay are as follows:

              - Drill hole JBL-18 from 55.45m to 87.55m for 32.10m at 1.83 %Li2O and from 177.90m to 213.30m for 35.40m at 1.43 %Li2O;

              - JBL17-19 from 0.00m to 98.75m for 98.80m at 1.62 %Li2O;

              - JBL17-20 from 16.15m to 85.00m for 68.90m at 1.55% Li2O;

              - JBL17-22 from 127.00m to 175.20m for 48.20m at 1.91% Li2O;

              - JBL17-53 from 162.84m to 246.03m for 83.19m at 1.56% Li2O (new pegmatite);

              - JBL17-54 from 142.34m to 183.92m for 41.58m at 1.87% Li2O;

              - JBL17-55 from 214.60m to 256.20m for 41.60m at 1.71 % Li2O (new pegmatite);

              - JBL17-56 from 29.51m to 83.27m for 53.76m at 1.55 % Li2O;

              - JBL17-57 from 0.70m to 74.56m for 73.90m at 1.50 % Li2O.

              Assays (see Table 1 in the link below) have been received for a further 32 diamond holes for 6,450m of 47.6mm (NQ) core diameter drilling. Drill hole collars are presented in Table 2 (see the link below).

              Both resource infill and resource extension diamond ( core ) drilling has been conducted. Pegmatites outcrop at surface as seen in Figure 1 (see link below) and the drill program as outlined in Figure 2 (see link below), has been targeting approximately 1,850m of pegmatite to the west of the James Bay Highway. Resource infill type drilling can be seen within known pegmatites, as shown in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below). The objective of this drilling is to improve and upgrade the resource classification of the existing resource to "measured" and "indicated" classifications.

              The resource extension drilling is aiming to test the extent of known pegmatites in areas where there are gaps and where there has been limited or no drilling, below the existing drilling sections. This drilling has now delineated two new large pegmatites in the gap between known pegmatites in the western part of the mineralized zone, shown in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below), with drill holes JBL17-19 (98.80m at 1.62 %Li2O); JBL17-53 (83.19m at 1.56% Li2O) and JBL17-57 (73.90m at 1.50 % Li2O) returning exceptional results. Intersections outside the current resource at its eastern extremity outlined in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below), returned more typical widths. Mineralization remains open at depth throughout and to the east of the highway.

              Galaxy's Managing Director and CEO, Anthony Tse, commented "The ongoing successful drilling at James Bay has demonstrated the significant scale of the project. The results of the campaign will provide the essential inputs to the James Bay resource upgrade, as well as the feasibility studies to be completed. The project will look to leverage off the existing infrastructure in Quebec, which we believe is a premier location for an integrated upstream and downstream operation to be developed".

              ABOUT THE JAMES BAY PROJECT

              The James Bay Project is located 2 kilometers south of the Eastmain River and 100 kilometers east of James Bay. The property is accessible by paved road from the James Bay Road which cuts through the property close to the 381km road marker on the highway Route/109 from Val d'Or, Quebec, Canada. Val d'Or is approximately 526km westward from Montreal, Quebec. A large, multi-service truck stop is located at marker 381.

              Discovered in the 1960's and then known as the Cyr property the site consists of a swarm of 33 pegmatite dykes that belong to the rare-element 'class', the LCT (Li-Cs- Ta) 'family' and the albite-spodumene 'type' according to the classification by Cerny (1991). Two new major pegmatite dykes have been discovered in this current drill campaign as well as smaller swarms eastward of the known extents. The mineralized pegmatite is open at depth and to the east. The lithium bearing mineral contained in the pegmatites is spodumene LiAl(Si2O6), a member of the pyroxene group of minerals. A classified resource was reported at cut-off grade of 0.75% Li2O of 11.75Mt @1.30% Li2O (Indicated) and 10.47Mt@1.20% Li2O (Inferred) within a conceptual pit shell using a lithium carbonate price of USD 6,000/t, metallurgical and process recovery of 70%, mining and process costs of USD 64 per tonne and overall pit slope of 45 degrees. The current resource is based on 14,457m of diamond drilling and 201.3m of horizontal channel sampling. The pegmatite swarms have dip direction ~N 103 degrees E., dip steeply at ~60 degrees westward and forms a corridor of discontinuous dykes about ~4km in length and ~300m wide. This outcrop is about 15-20m above the surrounding muskeg/swamp. This phase of drilling should be completed by the end of August, 2017.

              To view tables and figures, please visit:
              http://abnnewswire.net/lnk/Y184MW9I


              About Galaxy Resources Limited


              Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY) (OTCMKTS:GALXF) is an international S&P / ASX 200 Index company with lithium production facilities, hard rock mines and brine assets in Australia, Canada and Argentina. It wholly owns and operates the Mt Cattlin mine in Ravensthorpe Western Australia, which is currently producing spodumene and tantalum concentrate, and the James Bay lithium pegmatite project in Quebec, Canada.

              Galaxy is advancing plans to develop the Sal de Vida lithium and potash brine project in Argentina situated in the lithium triangle (where Chile, Argentina and Bolivia meet), which is currently the source of 60% of global lithium production. Sal de Vida has excellent potential as a low cost brine-based lithium carbonate production facility.

              Lithium compounds are used in the manufacture of ceramics, glass, and consumer electronics and are an essential cathode material for long life lithium-ion batteries used in hybrid and electric vehicles, as well as mass energy storage systems. Galaxy is bullish about the global lithium demand outlook and is aiming to become a major producer of lithium products.




              http://www.abnnewswire.net/press/en/...lts-89412.html

              Comentario


              • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY) James Bay Drilling Delivers Further High Grade Results

                WWW:www.galaxylithium.com

                Company Overview

                Perth, Aug 2, 2017 AEST (ABN Newswire) - Galaxy Resources Limited ("Galaxy" or the "Company") (ASX:GXY) (OTCMKTS:GALXF) is pleased to announce further assays from its 2017 drilling campaign at the James Bay Project in Quebec, Canada.

                In late March, the Galaxy James Bay team commenced a ~31,000m diamond drilling campaign to extend and develop the existing resource at the James Bay Project in Quebec, Canada. 29,300m of drilling to date has been completed with the entire program now expected to be completed by the end of August 2017.

                Highlights from the most recent stage of drilling (all intercept data reported downhole) and assay are as follows:

                - Drill hole JBL-18 from 55.45m to 87.55m for 32.10m at 1.83 %Li2O and from 177.90m to 213.30m for 35.40m at 1.43 %Li2O;

                - JBL17-19 from 0.00m to 98.75m for 98.80m at 1.62 %Li2O;

                - JBL17-20 from 16.15m to 85.00m for 68.90m at 1.55% Li2O;

                - JBL17-22 from 127.00m to 175.20m for 48.20m at 1.91% Li2O;

                - JBL17-53 from 162.84m to 246.03m for 83.19m at 1.56% Li2O (new pegmatite);

                - JBL17-54 from 142.34m to 183.92m for 41.58m at 1.87% Li2O;

                - JBL17-55 from 214.60m to 256.20m for 41.60m at 1.71 % Li2O (new pegmatite);

                - JBL17-56 from 29.51m to 83.27m for 53.76m at 1.55 % Li2O;

                - JBL17-57 from 0.70m to 74.56m for 73.90m at 1.50 % Li2O.

                Assays (see Table 1 in the link below) have been received for a further 32 diamond holes for 6,450m of 47.6mm (NQ) core diameter drilling. Drill hole collars are presented in Table 2 (see the link below).

                Both resource infill and resource extension diamond ( core ) drilling has been conducted. Pegmatites outcrop at surface as seen in Figure 1 (see link below) and the drill program as outlined in Figure 2 (see link below), has been targeting approximately 1,850m of pegmatite to the west of the James Bay Highway. Resource infill type drilling can be seen within known pegmatites, as shown in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below). The objective of this drilling is to improve and upgrade the resource classification of the existing resource to "measured" and "indicated" classifications.

                The resource extension drilling is aiming to test the extent of known pegmatites in areas where there are gaps and where there has been limited or no drilling, below the existing drilling sections. This drilling has now delineated two new large pegmatites in the gap between known pegmatites in the western part of the mineralized zone, shown in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below), with drill holes JBL17-19 (98.80m at 1.62 %Li2O); JBL17-53 (83.19m at 1.56% Li2O) and JBL17-57 (73.90m at 1.50 % Li2O) returning exceptional results. Intersections outside the current resource at its eastern extremity outlined in Figures 3 and 4 (see link below), returned more typical widths. Mineralization remains open at depth throughout and to the east of the highway.

                Galaxy's Managing Director and CEO, Anthony Tse, commented "The ongoing successful drilling at James Bay has demonstrated the significant scale of the project. The results of the campaign will provide the essential inputs to the James Bay resource upgrade, as well as the feasibility studies to be completed. The project will look to leverage off the existing infrastructure in Quebec, which we believe is a premier location for an integrated upstream and downstream operation to be developed".

                ABOUT THE JAMES BAY PROJECT

                The James Bay Project is located 2 kilometers south of the Eastmain River and 100 kilometers east of James Bay. The property is accessible by paved road from the James Bay Road which cuts through the property close to the 381km road marker on the highway Route/109 from Val d'Or, Quebec, Canada. Val d'Or is approximately 526km westward from Montreal, Quebec. A large, multi-service truck stop is located at marker 381.

                Discovered in the 1960's and then known as the Cyr property the site consists of a swarm of 33 pegmatite dykes that belong to the rare-element 'class', the LCT (Li-Cs- Ta) 'family' and the albite-spodumene 'type' according to the classification by Cerny (1991). Two new major pegmatite dykes have been discovered in this current drill campaign as well as smaller swarms eastward of the known extents. The mineralized pegmatite is open at depth and to the east. The lithium bearing mineral contained in the pegmatites is spodumene LiAl(Si2O6), a member of the pyroxene group of minerals. A classified resource was reported at cut-off grade of 0.75% Li2O of 11.75Mt @1.30% Li2O (Indicated) and 10.47Mt@1.20% Li2O (Inferred) within a conceptual pit shell using a lithium carbonate price of USD 6,000/t, metallurgical and process recovery of 70%, mining and process costs of USD 64 per tonne and overall pit slope of 45 degrees. The current resource is based on 14,457m of diamond drilling and 201.3m of horizontal channel sampling. The pegmatite swarms have dip direction ~N 103 degrees E., dip steeply at ~60 degrees westward and forms a corridor of discontinuous dykes about ~4km in length and ~300m wide. This outcrop is about 15-20m above the surrounding muskeg/swamp. This phase of drilling should be completed by the end of August, 2017.

                To view tables and figures, please visit:
                http://abnnewswire.net/lnk/Y184MW9I


                About Galaxy Resources Limited


                Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY) (OTCMKTS:GALXF) is an international S&P / ASX 200 Index company with lithium production facilities, hard rock mines and brine assets in Australia, Canada and Argentina. It wholly owns and operates the Mt Cattlin mine in Ravensthorpe Western Australia, which is currently producing spodumene and tantalum concentrate, and the James Bay lithium pegmatite project in Quebec, Canada.

                Galaxy is advancing plans to develop the Sal de Vida lithium and potash brine project in Argentina situated in the lithium triangle (where Chile, Argentina and Bolivia meet), which is currently the source of 60% of global lithium production. Sal de Vida has excellent potential as a low cost brine-based lithium carbonate production facility.

                Lithium compounds are used in the manufacture of ceramics, glass, and consumer electronics and are an essential cathode material for long life lithium-ion batteries used in hybrid and electric vehicles, as well as mass energy storage systems. Galaxy is bullish about the global lithium demand outlook and is aiming to become a major producer of lithium products.




                http://www.abnnewswire.net/press/en/...lts-89412.html


                Se anima con las noticias, cierra por encima del 8%

                Comentario


                • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                  Galaxy anticipa un fuerte crecimiento de la demanda de litio
                  3 abril 2016 - Anthony Tse, director gerente de Galaxy Resources Ltd, expuso un promisorio panorama para el mercado del litio en su presentación en Mines and Money (Londres).
                  La demanda de litio casi se cuadruplicará durante la próxima década, considerando los valores de 2014, gracias al crecimiento de la demanda de baterías para productos electrónicos, como a la nueva demanda de baterías para la industria automotriz y el sector energético. Esta afirmación fue realizada por Anthony Tse, director gerente de Galaxy Resources Ltd, durante la conferencia Mines and Money que se realiza en Londres.
                  El directivo de Galaxy sostuvo que proyecta que el consumo mundial de carbonato de litio equivalente (LCE) pasará de 150 mil toneladas en 2015 a 260 mil toneladas en 2020 y a 380 mil toneladas en 2025.
                  Según la presentación de Tse, el mayor consumo estará impulsado por una fuerte demanda de baterias, tanto del sector electrónico (dos tercios de la demanda actual), pero especialmente de otros sectores manufactureros.
                  En tal sentido, sostuvo que los mayores incrementos en la demanda de baterías de litio provendrían del sector automotriz y del sector de provisión de energía eléctrica, las cuales podrían representar el 50% de la demanda hacia 2020.
                  Al respecto, señaló que la progresiva reducción en los precios de los automóviles eléctricos impulsaría una mayor producción de baterías, lo cual queda reflejado en los proyectos de gigafactorias de Tesla, Foxconn y BYD.
                  Asimismo, la creciente presión por una mayor participación de energías renovables en la matriz energética elevará la demanda de medios de almacenamiento.
                  Galaxy Resources es propietaria del proyecto Sal de Vida, localizado en las provincias de Catamarca y Salta (Salar del Hombre Muerto), el cual se encuentra en etapa de factibildad y que tendría una capacidad de producción de 25.000 toneladas anuales de carbonato de litio y 95.000 toneladas de potasa.
                  Actualmente, se encuentra en proceso de restablecer la producción de su proyecto Mt. Cattlin (Australia), luego de su cierre en 2012 por la caída del precio del spodumene (concentrado de litio).
                  Alan Rule, chief financial officer of lithium miner Galaxy Resources, said he had recently had meetings with some of the biggest traditional car manufacturers in the world about whether the product from its proposed Sal de Vida and James Bay projects would meet their specifications



                  Read more:
                  http://www.afr.com/business/mining/e...#ixzz4p6AqsQyc

                  Comentario


                  • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                    La demanda de litio sigue creciendo y se espera que siga durante años. Numerosas casas de coches como Volvo , Volkswagen, etc ya tienen pensado ir aumentando los modelos de coches eléctricos.


                    Electric Vehicles
                    Add to myFT Electric car growth sparks environmental concerns
                    Mining of raw materials and recycling of lithium-ion batteries in spotlightRead next
                    Faraday scraps $1bn Las Vegas electric car factory
                    Tuesday, 11 July, 2017 Lithium is extracted from brines beneath the desert and evaporated using the energy of the sun © EPA
                    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Share on Whatsapp (opens new window) Print this page
                    Save July 7, 2017 by: Henry Sanderson

                    Tesla Motors and now Volvo may have big plans to end the addiction of drivers to fossil fuels via electric vehicles, however the environmental footprint of mining raw materials used in car batteries and their eventual disposal are emerging as a flash point.

                    As the mining sector presents a green face and extracts raw materials from lithium to cobalt and nickel that constitute electric batteries, so the focus on their environmental standards and energy efficient production methods will intensify. At the tail-end of the electric vehicle boom is the matter of improving the recycling of lithium-ion batteries and making sure the environmental impact is also contained.

                    “There will be more scrutiny over the supply chain for electric vehicles than there is from the consumer electronics industry due to the green credentials of EVs,” says Robert Baylis, an analyst at consultancy Roskill. “And recycling is probably not going to have an impact for 10 years, and may not reach significant volume for 15-30 years.”

                    This week Volvo Cars said by 2019 all its new cars will be electric, while Tesla is set to launch its first mass-market Model 3 electric car this month. A 12-fold increase in battery capacity will be required by 2025, according to analysts at UBS.

                    Mining companies are already positioning themselves to meet the increased need for raw materials that go into lithium-ion batteries, but there is growing concerns over their environmental footprint especially as a host of new mining companies start production to meet rapid rises in demand.



                    Lithium is currently extracted from brines beneath the deserts of South America and evaporated using the energy of the sun. But an increasing proportion is coming from crushing rock in Australia and processing the mineral in China, which is more energy intensive. Goldman Sachs expects capacity addition by hard rock to be equal to brine by 2020 in order to meet demand from electric vehicles.

                    In addition, most of the new supply is coming from smaller mining companies rather than established players, according to Francis Condon, an energy and mining analyst at fund manager RobecoSAM.

                    “We’re starting to see new sources being found and smaller mining companies and also non-mining companies getting involved,” says Mr Condon. “Some of these opportunities are arising where environmental codes are not as strong and social settings not as protective or inclusive. It’s a combination of risks.”

                    Most of the raw materials in an electric vehicle battery are used in the cathode, the electrode that provides electricity when the battery is discharging.

                    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart About 50 per cent of the energy footprint of the battery cathode is consumed by nickel and cobalt production. Lithium accounts for about 5-20 per cent, depending on whether it comes from brines or hard rock sources, according to David Deak, chief technical officer of miner Lithium Americas, and who formerly worked for Tesla.

                    “In the short term the CO2 footprint from [lithium] hardrocks will be less than ideal,” says Mr Deak. “But it is still extremely beneficial in offsetting the CO2 emissions that otherwise would come from internal combustion engines.”

                    He adds: “In the future, you can expect renewables to dominate as the energy source, thus reducing the CO2 footprint regardless of energy intensity of manufacturing.’’

                    Chile’s SQM, one of the largest producers of lithium from brine, said more than 97 per cent of its energy comes from the sun, and other types of energy is only used for pumping and transporting the brine to its plants. It estimates it produces 1 tonne of C02 per tonne of lithium carbonate produced.

                    Lex in-depth
                    Together in electric dreams
                    A collaborative future with traditional carmakers beckons

                    Tuesday, 11 July, 2017
                    Large mining companies are increasingly using renewable energy sources and trying to reduce their environmental impact as they supply materials for electric vehicle batteries.

                    Last month Russia’s Norilsk Nickel, the world’s second-largest nickel producer, signed an agreement with European chemicals company BASF for the supply of materials for the production of lithium-ion batteries in Europe.

                    Norilsk has started to release data on its greenhouse gas emissions. Last year it emitted over 10m tonnes of C02 equivalent but reduced the use of coal in its energy mix by 49 per cent, according to figures from the company.

                    “The mining industry needs to continue to improve, you can’t rest on laurels,” says Markus Meurer, head of global sales and marketing at Norilsk. “EVs gives us an additional opportunity to improve.”

                    Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart Still, there are unintended consequences from sudden demand for nickel in batteries, he says. Diversion of the metal from its traditional stainless steel market will mean increasing supply from polluting production in Indonesia and the Philippines.

                    To offset the environmental impact of mining there will have to be a large build out in recycling facilities to meet the first wave of electric vehicles, analysts say. Currently more than 90 per cent of lead-acid batteries used in conventional gasoline cars are recycled, versus less than 5 per cent of lithium-ion batteries. An estimated 11m tonnes of spent lithium-ion battery packs will be discarded between now and 2030, according to Canada-based Li-Cycle, a recycler of batteries.

                    “One of the challenges of making battery recycling economically viable is the quantity of battery material that is needed to keep utilisation rates of recycling facilities sufficiently high,” say analysts at Morgan Stanley. “The risk, therefore, is there may not be the necessary infrastructure in place in time for the first significant wave of EV batteries to reach end of life.”

                    Companies such as Belgium-based Umicore have already started to recycle lithium-ion batteries and are investing in expanding their capacity. Marc Grynberg, chief executive of Umicore, says massive volumes of spent batteries will start coming on to the market for recycling around 2025.

                    “Battery recycling will be crucial in order to deal with some of the concerns and issues in terms of availability of raw materials,” he adds.


                    Aug 25 2017 at 12:15 AM
                    Updated Aug 25 2017 at 12:15 AM
                    Save article Print License article Galaxy brings Goldman into its defence orbit
                    Share
                    Share via Email Share on Google Plus Post on facebook wall Share on twitter Post to Linkedin Share on Reddit Galaxy Resources has brought Goldman Sachs into its tent as a defence adviser.
                    Richard Drew
                    by
                    Sarah Thompson Anthony Macdonald Joyce Moullakis The price divergence between global and local lithium stocks has spurred some Australian listed companies into action.

                    Street Talk understands one of those is Galaxy Resources which has brought Goldman Sachs into its tent as a defence adviser.

                    This column is not suggesting Galaxy has received an approach or is about to. But against the current backdrop, it makes sense for Galaxy to shore up its advisory team.

                    Certainly, shares in Australian lithium players haven't experienced the same boost as their global rivals in 2017, which in theory could make this market a happy hunting ground.

                    Kidman Resources' market capitalisation is hovering at circa $213 million, making it easy prey for a large global predator. Galaxy's shares rallied as high as $2.46 in May this year and on Thursday were changing hands at $1.755, giving the company a market cap just shy of $700 million.

                    Related Quotes
                    5 years1 DayLast updated: Updating...Last updated: Updating...
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                    View all announcements In March, Galaxy was among several Australian lithium aspirants named in a presentation released by US lithium giant Albemarle that ranked the asset quality of the world's lithium mines.

                    Albemarle and other majors, which have traditionally produced lithium from brines, have been prowling Western Australia for hard rock lithium assets they can take a stake in, or take out completely.

                    While brine-based lithium is cheaper to produce, sources have said Asian battery manufacturers have stated a preference for the higher quality lithium derived from hard rock assets, driving brine-based companies and upstream players to look at deals they would not have previously considered.

                    Chile's SQM acquired half of Kidman Resources' Earl Grey lithium project for $US110 million in July, and a number of Chinese

                    Read more: http://www.afr.com/street-talk/galax...#ixzz4qhYNjLIB
                    Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook

                    Comentario


                    • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                      La demanda de litio sigue creciendo y se espera que siga durante años. Numerosas casas de coches como Volvo , Volkswagen, etc ya tienen pensado ir aumentando los modelos de coches eléctricos.


                      Electric Vehicles
                      Add to myFT Electric car growth sparks environmental concerns
                      Mining of raw materials and recycling of lithium-ion batteries in spotlightRead next
                      Faraday scraps $1bn Las Vegas electric car factory
                      Tuesday, 11 July, 2017 Lithium is extracted from brines beneath the desert and evaporated using the energy of the sun © EPA
                      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Share on Whatsapp (opens new window) Print this page
                      Save July 7, 2017 by: Henry Sanderson

                      Tesla Motors and now Volvo may have big plans to end the addiction of drivers to fossil fuels via electric vehicles, however the environmental footprint of mining raw materials used in car batteries and their eventual disposal are emerging as a flash point.

                      As the mining sector presents a green face and extracts raw materials from lithium to cobalt and nickel that constitute electric batteries, so the focus on their environmental standards and energy efficient production methods will intensify. At the tail-end of the electric vehicle boom is the matter of improving the recycling of lithium-ion batteries and making sure the environmental impact is also contained.

                      “There will be more scrutiny over the supply chain for electric vehicles than there is from the consumer electronics industry due to the green credentials of EVs,” says Robert Baylis, an analyst at consultancy Roskill. “And recycling is probably not going to have an impact for 10 years, and may not reach significant volume for 15-30 years.”

                      This week Volvo Cars said by 2019 all its new cars will be electric, while Tesla is set to launch its first mass-market Model 3 electric car this month. A 12-fold increase in battery capacity will be required by 2025, according to analysts at UBS.

                      Mining companies are already positioning themselves to meet the increased need for raw materials that go into lithium-ion batteries, but there is growing concerns over their environmental footprint especially as a host of new mining companies start production to meet rapid rises in demand.



                      Lithium is currently extracted from brines beneath the deserts of South America and evaporated using the energy of the sun. But an increasing proportion is coming from crushing rock in Australia and processing the mineral in China, which is more energy intensive. Goldman Sachs expects capacity addition by hard rock to be equal to brine by 2020 in order to meet demand from electric vehicles.

                      In addition, most of the new supply is coming from smaller mining companies rather than established players, according to Francis Condon, an energy and mining analyst at fund manager RobecoSAM.

                      “We’re starting to see new sources being found and smaller mining companies and also non-mining companies getting involved,” says Mr Condon. “Some of these opportunities are arising where environmental codes are not as strong and social settings not as protective or inclusive. It’s a combination of risks.”

                      Most of the raw materials in an electric vehicle battery are used in the cathode, the electrode that provides electricity when the battery is discharging.

                      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart About 50 per cent of the energy footprint of the battery cathode is consumed by nickel and cobalt production. Lithium accounts for about 5-20 per cent, depending on whether it comes from brines or hard rock sources, according to David Deak, chief technical officer of miner Lithium Americas, and who formerly worked for Tesla.

                      “In the short term the CO2 footprint from [lithium] hardrocks will be less than ideal,” says Mr Deak. “But it is still extremely beneficial in offsetting the CO2 emissions that otherwise would come from internal combustion engines.”

                      He adds: “In the future, you can expect renewables to dominate as the energy source, thus reducing the CO2 footprint regardless of energy intensity of manufacturing.’’

                      Chile’s SQM, one of the largest producers of lithium from brine, said more than 97 per cent of its energy comes from the sun, and other types of energy is only used for pumping and transporting the brine to its plants. It estimates it produces 1 tonne of C02 per tonne of lithium carbonate produced.

                      Lex in-depth
                      Together in electric dreams
                      A collaborative future with traditional carmakers beckons

                      Tuesday, 11 July, 2017
                      Large mining companies are increasingly using renewable energy sources and trying to reduce their environmental impact as they supply materials for electric vehicle batteries.

                      Last month Russia’s Norilsk Nickel, the world’s second-largest nickel producer, signed an agreement with European chemicals company BASF for the supply of materials for the production of lithium-ion batteries in Europe.

                      Norilsk has started to release data on its greenhouse gas emissions. Last year it emitted over 10m tonnes of C02 equivalent but reduced the use of coal in its energy mix by 49 per cent, according to figures from the company.

                      “The mining industry needs to continue to improve, you can’t rest on laurels,” says Markus Meurer, head of global sales and marketing at Norilsk. “EVs gives us an additional opportunity to improve.”

                      Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share this chart Still, there are unintended consequences from sudden demand for nickel in batteries, he says. Diversion of the metal from its traditional stainless steel market will mean increasing supply from polluting production in Indonesia and the Philippines.

                      To offset the environmental impact of mining there will have to be a large build out in recycling facilities to meet the first wave of electric vehicles, analysts say. Currently more than 90 per cent of lead-acid batteries used in conventional gasoline cars are recycled, versus less than 5 per cent of lithium-ion batteries. An estimated 11m tonnes of spent lithium-ion battery packs will be discarded between now and 2030, according to Canada-based Li-Cycle, a recycler of batteries.

                      “One of the challenges of making battery recycling economically viable is the quantity of battery material that is needed to keep utilisation rates of recycling facilities sufficiently high,” say analysts at Morgan Stanley. “The risk, therefore, is there may not be the necessary infrastructure in place in time for the first significant wave of EV batteries to reach end of life.”

                      Companies such as Belgium-based Umicore have already started to recycle lithium-ion batteries and are investing in expanding their capacity. Marc Grynberg, chief executive of Umicore, says massive volumes of spent batteries will start coming on to the market for recycling around 2025.

                      “Battery recycling will be crucial in order to deal with some of the concerns and issues in terms of availability of raw materials,” he adds.
                      Resultados financieros de la mitad de año. Pienso que a partir de ahora el crecimiento podría ser espectacular con los proyectos que aún no han iniciado


                      http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/2017083...1pz2037g6w.pdf

                      Comentario









                      • Is Galaxy Resources Limited’s (ASX:GXY) Balance Sheet Strong Enough To Weather A Storm?

                        Scott Perkins August 31, 2017
                        Investors are always looking for growth in small-cap stocks like Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY), with a market cap of $700.24M. However, an important fact which most ignore is: how financially healthy is the company? The significance of doing due diligence on a company’s financial strength stems from the fact that over 20,000 companies go bankrupt in every quarter in the US alone. Here are few basic financial health checks to judge whether a company fits the bill or there is an additional risk which you should consider before taking the plunge. Check out our latest analysis for Galaxy Resources
                        How does GXY’s operating cash flow stack up against its debt?

                        ASX:GXY Historical Debt Aug 31st 17 Unxpected adverse events, such as natural disasters and wars, can be a true test of a company’s capacity to meet its obligations.These catastrophes does not mean the company can stop servicing its debt obligations.Can GXY pay off what it owes to its debtholder by using only cash from its operational activities? In the case of GXY, operating cash flow turned out to be 0.54x its debt level over the past twelve months. A ratio of over 0.5x is a positive sign and shows that GXY is generating more than enough cash from its core business, which should increase its potential to pay back near-term debt.

                        Comentario


                        • Can GXY pay its short-term liabilities?

                          ASX:GXY Net Worth Aug 31st 17 In addition to debtholders, a company must be able to pay its bills and salaries to keep the business running. As cash flow from operation is hindered by adverse events, GXY may need to liquidate its short-term assets to meet these upcoming payments. We should examine if the company’s cash and short-term investment levels match its current liabilities. Our analysis shows that GXY does have enough liquid assets on hand to meet its upcoming liabilities, which lowers our concerns should adverse events arise.

                          Is GXY’s level of debt at an acceptable level?

                          While ideally the debt-to equity ratio of a financially healthy company should be less than 40%, several factors such as industry life-cycle and economic conditions can result in a company raising a significant amount of debt. GXY’s debt-to-equity ratio stands at 2.37%, which indicates that the company faces low risk associated with debt. No matter how high the company’s debt, if it can easily cover the interest payments, it’s considered to be efficient with its use of excess leverage. A company generating earnings at least three times its interest payments is considered financially sound. GXY’s profits only covers interest 0.24 times, which is deemed as inadequate. Debtors may be less inclined to loan the company more money, giving GXY less headroom for growth through debt.
                          Final words

                          Although GXY’s debt level is relatively low, it has the ability to efficiently utilise its borrowings to generate ample cash flow coverage. In addition to this, the company will be able to pay all of its upcoming liabilities from its current short-term assets. Now that you know to keep debt in mind when putting together your investment thesis, I recommend you
                          check out our latest free analysis report on Galaxy Resources to see what other factors for GXY you should consider.

                          Comentario


                          • [ Why the Galaxy Resources Ltd share price is soaring today

                            Motley Fool Staff | September 1, 2017 | More on: GXY
                            The Galaxy Resources Ltd (ASX: GXY) share price is up 7% today after the lithium miner reported a positive cash flow of $7.6 million on revenues of $14.1 million for the half-year period ending June 30, 2017.

                            After a $61 million capital raising conducted in February 2017 the company also has a healthy balance sheet of $40.3 million in cash in hand to invest in expanding its lithium mining operations in Argentina and Australia.

                            Just prior to Galaxy releasing its results it had more than 11 per cent of its shares sold short by speculators betting that they were likely to…

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                            Enter your email below for FREE access to this article and all the content on the site. Also receive Take Stock, The Motley Fool's unique daily email on what's really happening with the share market. You may unsubscribe any time.
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                            The Galaxy Resources Ltd (ASX: GXY) share price is up 7% today after the lithium miner reported a positive cash flow of $7.6 million on revenues of $14.1 million for the half-year period ending June 30, 2017.
                            After a $61 million capital raising conducted in February 2017 the company also has a healthy balance sheet of $40.3 million in cash in hand to invest in expanding its lithium mining operations in Argentina and Australia.
                            Just prior to Galaxy releasing its results it had more than 11 per cent of its shares sold short by speculators betting that they were likely to fall. The stock is up 15 per cent since it reported on August 28 and part of the price rise is probably related to the short sellers being forced to by back their shares in reaction to the strength of Galaxy’s results.
                            The company produced 14,038 tonnes of lithium in June, which equates to an annual run rate of 168,000 tonnes. Galaxy has a market value around $750 million and its shares may remain volatile over the next 12 months.

                            Comentario


                            • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                              [ Why the Galaxy Resources Ltd share price is soaring today

                              Motley Fool Staff | September 1, 2017 | More on: GXY
                              The Galaxy Resources Ltd (ASX: GXY) share price is up 7% today after the lithium miner reported a positive cash flow of $7.6 million on revenues of $14.1 million for the half-year period ending June 30, 2017.

                              After a $61 million capital raising conducted in February 2017 the company also has a healthy balance sheet of $40.3 million in cash in hand to invest in expanding its lithium mining operations in Argentina and Australia.

                              Just prior to Galaxy releasing its results it had more than 11 per cent of its shares sold short by speculators betting that they were likely to…

                              To keep reading, enter your email address or login below.

                              Enter your email below for FREE access to this article and all the content on the site. Also receive Take Stock, The Motley Fool's unique daily email on what's really happening with the share market. You may unsubscribe any time.
                              Already a member? Login here.

                              By clicking this button, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. We will use your email address only to keep you informed about other products and services we think might interest you. Please read our Financial Services Guide (FSG) for more information.

                              The Galaxy Resources Ltd (ASX: GXY) share price is up 7% today after the lithium miner reported a positive cash flow of $7.6 million on revenues of $14.1 million for the half-year period ending June 30, 2017.
                              After a $61 million capital raising conducted in February 2017 the company also has a healthy balance sheet of $40.3 million in cash in hand to invest in expanding its lithium mining operations in Argentina and Australia.
                              Just prior to Galaxy releasing its results it had more than 11 per cent of its shares sold short by speculators betting that they were likely to fall. The stock is up 15 per cent since it reported on August 28 and part of the price rise is probably related to the short sellers being forced to by back their shares in reaction to the strength of Galaxy’s results.
                              The company produced 14,038 tonnes of lithium in June, which equates to an annual run rate of 168,000 tonnes. Galaxy has a market value around $750 million and its shares may remain volatile over the next 12 months.
                              Otra buena subida, se pone en máximos del año en 2,37 aud

                              http://www.google.com/finance?q=ASX%...LsTfsgH-v6qwBA

                              Comentario


                              • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje







                                Is Galaxy Resources Limited’s (ASX:GXY) Balance Sheet Strong Enough To Weather A Storm?

                                Scott Perkins August 31, 2017
                                Investors are always looking for growth in small-cap stocks like Galaxy Resources Limited (ASX:GXY), with a market cap of $700.24M. However, an important fact which most ignore is: how financially healthy is the company? The significance of doing due diligence on a company’s financial strength stems from the fact that over 20,000 companies go bankrupt in every quarter in the US alone. Here are few basic financial health checks to judge whether a company fits the bill or there is an additional risk which you should consider before taking the plunge. Check out our latest analysis for Galaxy Resources
                                How does GXY’s operating cash flow stack up against its debt?

                                ASX:GXY Historical Debt Aug 31st 17 Unxpected adverse events, such as natural disasters and wars, can be a true test of a company’s capacity to meet its obligations.These catastrophes does not mean the company can stop servicing its debt obligations.Can GXY pay off what it owes to its debtholder by using only cash from its operational activities? In the case of GXY, operating cash flow turned out to be 0.54x its debt level over the past twelve months. A ratio of over 0.5x is a positive sign and shows that GXY is generating more than enough cash from its core business, which should increase its potential to pay back near-term debt.


                                Fuertes pedidos para China


                                http://gestion.pe/mercados/anuncio-c...rsores-2199720

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                                • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                                  Resultados financieros de la mitad de año. Pienso que a partir de ahora el crecimiento podría ser espectacular con los proyectos que aún no han iniciado


                                  http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/2017083...1pz2037g6w.pdf
                                  Está disparadísima, 12% arriba

                                  http://www.google.com/finance?q=ASX%...NoGosQGzwZ3wBw

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                                  • Originalmente publicado por jerez1 Ver Mensaje
                                    Siguen las buenas noticias


                                    Galaxy Resources Limited James Bay Drilling - Significant Mineralisation Extended

                                    09/14/2017 | 01:45am CEST
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                                    Perth, Australia (ABN Newswire) - Galaxy Resources Limited ("Galaxy" or the "Company") (ASX:GXY) (OTCMKTS:GALXF) is pleased to announce further assays from its 2017 drilling campaign at its James Bay Project ("James Bay "), Quebec, Canada.

                                    In late March, the Galaxy James Bay team commenced a ~33,000m diamond drilling campaign to extend and develop the existing James Bay spodumene resource in Quebec, Canada - the program is now complete. All assays are expected to be finalized by the end of September 2017.

                                    All intercepts below are reported downhole.

                                    Highlights from this round of drilling and assay are:

                                    - 56.6m at 1.61% Li2O from 89.3m to 145.9m (drill hole JBL17- 09)

                                    - 49.6m at 1.60% Li2O from 17.0m to 66.6m (drill hole JBL17- 30)

                                    - 34.5m at 1.63% Li2O from 68.8m to 103.3m (drill hole JBL17-104)

                                    - 35.9m at 1.54 % Li2O from 2.0m to 37.9m (drill holeJBL17-105)
                                    and 53.5m at 1.72 % Li2O from 68.5m to 122.0m

                                    - 41.0m at 1.81 % Li2O from 25.8m to 66.8m (drill hole JBL17-106)
                                    and 88.4m at 1.46 % Li2O from 204.1m to 292.5 m

                                    - 34.2m at 1.29 at % Li2O from 86.0m to 120.2m (drill hole JBL17-60)

                                    Assays (Tables 1 and 2, see the link below) have been received for a further 49 diamond holes for 10,111m of NQ drilling (collars, Table 1, see the link below). Drilling has been both resource infill and resource extensional in type. All drilling is diamond (core). Pegmatites outcrop at surface and the drill program has targeted approximately 1,850m of pegmatite outcrop westward of the James Bay Highway. The first three drill holes east of the highway returned economic grades in pegmatite. The resource remains open and largely untested east of the James Bay Highway.

                                    Thicker pegmatites at the western extremity of the known mineralization remain open and untested below the limits of the current drilling. The now-completed drilling program will be used for a mineral resource re-estimate and upgrade, which is expected to be finalised by the end of October 2017.

                                    Galaxy's Managing Director and CEO, Anthony Tse, commented "The results from this last set of assays are very good and reaffirm the potential of James Bay, as a long-life high grade spodumene project. We look forward to the outcome of the resource upgrade which will follow. The Project Notice, which outlines the scope of the project, is expected to be submitted shortly to the relevant departments in both the Quebec Government and the Federal Government of Canada. "

                                    Further assay results will be released as they are received over the coming weeks.

                                    All results are listed in Table 2, see the link below.

                                    ABOUT THE JAMES BAY PROJECT

                                    The James Bay Pegmatite swarm is located 10km south of the Eastmain River and 100 kilometers east of James Bay. The property is accessible by paved road from the James Bay Road which cuts through the property close to the 381km road marker on the highway Route/109 from Val d'Or, Quebec, Canada. Val d'Or is approximately 526km westward from Montreal, Quebec. A large, multi-service truck stop is located at marker 381. Discovered in the 1960's and then known as the Cyr property the site consists of a swarm of 33 pegmatite dykes that belong to the rare-element 'class', the LCT (Li-Cs- Ta) 'family' and the albite-spodumene 'type' per the classification by Cerny (1991). Two new major pegmatite dykes have been discovered in this current campaign as well as smaller swarms eastward of the known extent. The mineralised pegmatite is open at depth and to the east. The lithium bearing mineral contained in the pegmatites is spodumene LiAl(Si2O6), a member of the pyroxene group of minerals. A classified resource was reported at cut-off grade of 0.75% Li2O of 11.75Mt @ 1.30% Li2O (Indicated) and 10.47Mt @ 1.20% Li2O (Inferred) within a conceptual pit shell using a lithium carbonate price of USD 6,000/t, metallurgical and process recovery of 70%, mining and process costs of USD 64 per tonne and overall pit slope of 45 degrees. The current resource is based on 14,457m of diamond drilling and 201.3m of horizontal channel sampling. The pegmatite swarms have dip direction ~N 103 degrees E., dip steeply at ~60 degrees westward and forms a corridor of discontinuous dykes about ~4km in length and ~300m wide. This outcrop is to about 15-20m above the surrounding muskeg/swamp. This phase of drilling is complete.

                                    To view tables and figures, please visit:
                                    http://abnnewswire.net/lnk/KPVQY78H

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                                    • Está muy fuerte de nuevo. Otro 6% arriba

                                      http://finance.google.com/finance?q=ASX:GXY

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                                      • Buenas Jerez soy nuevo en esto de las mineras de litio he estado mirando algunas estas últimas semanas /meses pero muchas de las que he mirado han subido ya bastante
                                        Cómo estás bastante puesto en el tema me recomiendas algunas para mirarlas con calma que veas buena opción ahora ?
                                        Ahora recientemente estoy mirando lithium Australia que veo que hay post y la llevas haber si me dices alguna más te lo agradecería

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                                        • Libros de Gregorio Hernández Jiménez (invertirenbolsa.info)
                                          Originalmente publicado por lullabite Ver Mensaje
                                          Buenas Jerez soy nuevo en esto de las mineras de litio he estado mirando algunas estas últimas semanas /meses pero muchas de las que he mirado han subido ya bastante
                                          Cómo estás bastante puesto en el tema me recomiendas algunas para mirarlas con calma que veas buena opción ahora ?
                                          Ahora recientemente estoy mirando lithium Australia que veo que hay post y la llevas haber si me dices alguna más te lo agradecería
                                          Ten cuidado compañero.... Mira mineras de Litio más sólidas y con mejores fundamentales. Galaxy Resources, Neometals, etc., son empresas muy especulativas y no aptas para novatos.
                                          DISCLAIMER: NOVATO en la inversión activa en el mercado de valores. Avisados estáis

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